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1 Proposal: number 92

92. DRAM 101: Introduction to Play and Performance

Contact:Charles Repole
Abstract:Course Description:
Please include a course description. If the course will include variable topics
or be taught in various forms, please provide as many descriptions of specific
sections as possible.

This course will help students understand the process by which a theatrical
text is transformed into live performance.

It is understood that each instructor of this course will realize this goal in
her or his own way. What follows is a model that can be modified.

The course will develop the kinds of tools for analyzing texts that are
essential for directors, designers and actors. It will accomplish this by,
among other things, combining the approaches of such theorists of the theatre
as Aristotle, Stanislavsky and Brecht with approaches to textual analysis
taught in departments of language and literature.

Students will use their new analytic tools to identify motifs_based on
recurrent images, phrases, ideas, events, character types--that give a work its
coherence and allow directors to develop a production concept. Students will go
beyond the basics of plot, character and theme to discover those aspects of a
play that are not immediately apparent, yet are essential to understanding the
work. They will test their analytic tools on a wide range of dramatic
literature drawn from many times and cultures, and discover both the utility
and limitations of the tools_learning something about experimental methods
through studying the arts.

The course will attempt to counter both anti-literary and anti-theatrical
prejudices. The first treats a dramatic text as the mere plaything of visionary
directors; the second regards performance as a doomed attempt to render the
poetic soul of a great drama in frail actorly flesh.

Submissions and Approvals

Course Date Requirement Action By Whom Notes
DRAM 101 2008-09-12 AP Submitted Dept
DRAM 101 2009-03-04 AP Approved GEAC
DRAM 101 2009-04-02 AP Approved UCC
DRAM 101 2009-04-02 AP Approved Senate